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A Seesaw Of Emotions: Helping Your Children Cope With A Severely Unwell Dog

A Seesaw Of Emotions: Helping Your Children Cope With A Severely Unwell Dog, sick dog, dying pet, child and pet

A Seesaw Of Emotions: Helping Your Children Cope With A Severely Unwell Dog, sick dog, dying pet, child and pet

A dog is as much a part of the family as anyone. And, as a way to improve your child’s social skills, a dog provides that unflinching enthusiasm- they will love them no matter what. But what happens when the family pet is unwell? What can you do as a family, but also, what can you do for the benefit of the children?

Ensure What You’re Doing Is For The Benefit Of The Pet

Sometimes excessive medical bills can mean that taking care of the dog can cause a lot of financial difficulties. It’s a very difficult balance because you don’t want to find yourself in debt up to your eyeballs, but also you don’t want to sit by and let the illness take your dog away, especially when your children love them so much. It’s something that you can struggle come to terms with. But you need to ensure you’ve done everything you can. It’s alternative, but there are therapies and medications you can read about online that can result in miracles. CBD oil is something that you may have heard of, and it’s not just beneficial for humans, but it can help dogs. And if you are wondering how much CBD oil should I give my dog, there’s plenty of information online. As far as looking for ways to combat the illness, if money is a problem, it forces you to find other ways to solve the predicament. But you need to ensure you are happy that you’ve done everything you can, regardless of the outcome.

Building a Strong Family despite the distractions of the worldPulling Together As A Family

If money is a problem, then you can pull together and conserve your finances so the dog gets the best possible treatments. But you need to come together as a family so that everyone is supported, especially if this dog has been with you for so long. From the outside looking in, many people gravely underestimate the impact a dog can have on a family. It can teach us so much, and they’ve given us so much love, that we need to pull together as a family and ensure that everybody is feeling supported. And when a dog is unwell, or worse, it can feel as bad as a close family member having similar problems.

Preparing Your Child For The Worst

(In The Best Possible Way)

It’s something that no parent wants to go through, but if you’re giving the news that the dog may not bounce back; you have to prepare the children for what could happen. This could be heartbreaking for us to go through because we don’t want to see our children upset. The best solution is to offer age-related explanations. You don’t want to give your children too much information if they’re not able to cope. And while it’s a commonly used approach – that the dog has “gone next door”, you need to judge whether this is something that may work. Terms like “passed away” or gone on a trip may not work, because you could make the mistake of leaving your child in hope that the dog will come back. You may have to discuss the idea of euthanasia, or putting the dog down, but from the child’s perspective, this may seem like a cruel and heartless thing to do, but this is why you have to explain why this could be the best solution, not for everyone, but the dog themselves. As a pet can suffer so much, and that putting them down can be a solution that’s for the very best, understandably, your children will be upset. Give them space and give them time.

A Seesaw Of Emotions: Helping Your Children Cope With A Severely Unwell Dog, sick dog, dying pet, child and pet

Nursing Your Dog Back To Health

On the other hand, miracles may work, and you have a dog that has bounced back or is in the process of getting better. Nursing your dog back to health isn’t just one person’s responsibility, it’s the entire families. The important thing to remember is that, even though your children have gone through the gamut of emotions, everyone isn’t out of the woods just yet. It’s at this point that your family needs to pull together, and you all have to do things for the best of the dog. Of course, your children being so close to the pet means that they will do whatever it takes. But it’s important at this point to communicate to the children that they won’t be able to do the same things as they used to. Maybe they will soon, but for now, it’s about the care and attention every single member of the family has to give.

A Seesaw Of Emotions: Helping Your Children Cope With A Severely Unwell Dog, sick dog, dying pet, child and pet

Teaching Children The Responsibilities

In many ways, a dog suffering from an illness can help teach a child responsibility. In some ways, it can force them to grow up, but this is all relative depending on the age. Nursing the dog back to health, or giving them or care and comfort if they are gravely unwell are skills that our kids can benefit from. As a family, splitting the duties up so you are all working together for the benefit of the dog is great. And if the dog needs additional medication, and your children are old enough, then you can supervise them dispensing medication, or, at the very least, show your children what you doing. It demystifies things. Our instinct as parents can be to protect our children from bad news, but when a pet is unwell, you’ve got to decide how much you’re willing to shield your children from this.

It’s a seesaw of emotions, and helping our children to cope with the family pet that’s unwell can be difficult for us as well. After all, it’s likely that this is the first time our children have been exposed to something like this. And in many ways, it’s better for them to experience it through the sickness of a pet rather than a family member. Unfortunately, it’s one of those things that we all have to go through, and if it gets to the point where the dog passes on, helping our children to cope with the grief is difficult, but it’s a healthy process.

A dog is as much a part of the family as anyone. And, as a way to improve your child's social skills, a dog provides that unflinching enthusiasm- they will love them no matter what. But what happens when the family pet is unwell? What can you do as a family, but also, what can you do for the benefit of the children? #deathofpet #familypet #dyingpet #childanddog #childandcat #momlifeoptimized #momlife

 

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A dog is as much a part of the family as anyone. And, as a way to improve your child's social skills, a dog provides that unflinching enthusiasm- they will love them no matter what. But what happens when the family pet is unwell? What can you do as a family, but also, what can you do for the benefit of the children? #deathofpet #familypet #dyingpet #childanddog #childandcat #momlifeoptimized #momlife

 

 

 

11 Comments

  1. Bri Adams on January 25, 2019 at 8:59 pm

    This is always such a difficult thing to go through. Thanks for shining some light!

  2. Mama Writes Reviews on January 24, 2019 at 10:27 am

    We went through this almost 2 years ago with our beloved family dog… My sons were almost 2 and 4 1/2 at the time. My youngest didn’t quite understand and doesn’t really remember her, but my now 6 1/2 year old remembers his dog very well and remembers how sick she was. We waited too long to end her misery and her last few days on Earth were absolutely miserable (she had lymphoma and was too far gone to do anything about it). MY SON REMEMBERS HER MISERY. That’s the one thing I won’t forgive myself for. After she died, we got my oldest a stuffed animal that looked just like her and he STILL carries it almost everywhere he can with him (trips to Grandma and Granddad’s house, the doctor, etc.). And there’s this cardinal that hangs around our house that started showing up shortly after she died and we call her the Buffy Bird… (her name was Buffy) and she’s watching over us. It’s this one specific Cardinal too… he has a spot on his left wing that is unique to him.
    We have two other dogs we adopted since then (that’s what I needed to cope), and they’re certainly no replacement, but I couldn’t stand being without a dog.

    Just a few days ago, my sister-in-law had to have her 17 year old cat put down (she had him for 12 of those years). My sons were DEVASTATED about that too. (and I was, as well. I went with her to have it done because no one should be alone when they have to have their pets put down like I was with Buffy)

    Our pets are family. Period.

    • Jackie on January 27, 2019 at 8:42 pm

      Thank you for sharing these stories! It is so real and raw and a difficult experience for our children!

  3. Vonetta on January 24, 2019 at 10:03 am

    Dealing the death or an illness of a pet is such a difficult thing. I think these tips will help make the process just a tiny bit easier for everyone.

  4. Tracy @ Cleland Clan on January 24, 2019 at 5:42 am

    It’s so hard to lose a pet even when you have time to prepare. They definitely become part of the family.

    • Jackie on January 24, 2019 at 5:44 am

      Yes, I agree! No matter what losing a pet is so difficult and I think some in our circle of friends don’t always realize how hard it is to grieve the loss of a pet, especially for our children.

  5. Jen @Jenron Designs on January 24, 2019 at 5:21 am

    Wow this post had me sobbing, I am such an animal lover and I know how difficult is it to deal with an ailing pet. Such a challenging situation.

    • Jackie on January 24, 2019 at 5:43 am

      It really is! Many people don’t realize how much a pet is just like any other member of your immediate family.

  6. Fiorella on January 23, 2019 at 11:19 pm

    The bond between children and their pets is so special that this topic needs to be highlighted when the pet is having a bad moment. Great post!

    • Jackie on January 24, 2019 at 5:43 am

      Thank you! Yes, I believe that same thing, we don’t realize the affect even if the pet is just really sick.

  7. Madi Rowan on January 23, 2019 at 8:27 pm

    Ugh such a difficult thing to deal with no matter your age. I was so fortunate to grow up with an amazing & relatively healthy golden retriever who lived to be 14!
    -Madi xo | http://www.everydaywithmadirae.com

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